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Fruit

Why eat more Fruit

Eat (more) fruit
These ideas might stimulate your fruit consumption!
Why should we have five to nine fresh pieces a day, organically grown if possible?

If you think about it, it's logical for the human body to consume food that contains as much water as the body itself. The nutrition that meets that requirement is fruit. There is no other food than fruit on this planet that contains on average 80% water.Vegetables also contain a lot of water and are therefore second best. 

Fruit is 100% bad-cholesterol free
No doubt about this argument. Too much bad-cholesterol is not good for our bodies and fruit doesn't contain bad-cholesterol. Animal products like meat and dairy contain a lot of bad-cholesterol.

Fruit stimulates the memory
If you didn’t know yet: fruit is the ultimate brain fuel. Fruit has a positive effect on our brains. The way this works still has to be found out and many scientists are looking into it as we speak. What we do know is that if you consume fruit effectively, your brains can recall information faster and more easily. This is very useful information for people who are preparing for an exam.

The idea that fruit is an expensive nutrition
Did you always think that fruit was an expensive product? Take a good look at how much money you spend on other food. It could be worth something to replace some of those expenses with fruit. We think that fruit is the healthiest food on earth and therefore it is well worth spending our money on.

The miraculous healing effects of fruit
Spectacular stories about people that cured from uncurable diseases by a strict diet of raw fruits and/or vegetables are well known but do we want to believe them? We still don't know that much about fruit and its contents.

Fibers
We do know now that a diet with plenty of fibers helps against corpulence, high blood pressure, and other factors that increase the chance for a heart disease. The consumed amount of fibers maybe even a more important factor than the amount of fat that is consumed by people!

The food that contains these healthy (natural) fibers is.... right: fruit! (vegetables as well). The American Heart Association advises to consume 25 to 30 grams of fibers out of fresh fruits and/or vegetables. In practice this means: have five to nine portions of fresh fruits or vegetables a day. 

Fruit makes you feel better
Several stories have told us about people that were frequently depressed and how they got out of their depression slowly but surely after consuming substantial amounts of fresh fruit on a regular basis. Eating much fruit can have a mysterious healing effect on human beings. Even better is to drink a lot of freshly squeezed fruit drinks on a regular basis. It will take approximately 30 days until you start to notice the effects. Don't forget to drink these smoothies 20 minutes before the consumption of other meals. This way the fruit will not ferment in the stomach and the nutritious elements can be absorbed by the blood effectively.

Ethical reasons to eat fruit
Fruit doesn't have to be killed and slaughtered before you can eat it. The fruits are just hanging there waiting to be picked by you!

This ethical argument (often used by vegetarians and vegans to not eat meat) claims that fruit is a non-animal food. Many people see animals, especially mammals, as living creatures just like humans. There are religions that say that animals have souls like us. The native Americans first asked the animal's spirit if they could kill it before they did so. Fruit has never been said to have a soul and thus can be eaten without causing any harm. Ethical or religious arguments aside, we think it's a shame that we as human beings don't eat much fruit when there is such an abundant assortment of fruits and vegetables available.

Fruit is the most natural food
When you see a piece of fruit hanging from a tree that tree is telling you something: "Eat my fruits and help me spread my seeds."  That’s how nature works. Humans eat vegetables and fruits and consequently help the plants to spread. Humans use animals to work the land to grow the plants and trees that produce these fruits and vegetables. In more and more people's opinion this is the way it was all meant to be. 

A human diet 
A healthy diet should consist for a great deal of freshly squeezed fruit juices, raw fruits and vegetables. Some tips:

  • A good start is to eat and drink more fresh fruits;
  • it’s as simple as that. Before you know it you will feel much better;
  • Don't forget to eat fruit on an empty stomach, not after other meals and;
  • inform yourself about the substances that our 'modern' food contains.

 

Animal Studies Suggest Vegetables Can Reduce Hardening of Arteries

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. New research suggests one reason vegetables may be so good for us. A study in mice found that a mixture of five common vegetables reduced hardening of the arteries by 38 percent compared to animals eating a non-vegetable diet. Conducted by Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the research is reported in the current issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

"While everyone knows that eating more vegetables is supposed to be good for you, no one had shown before that it can actually inhibit the development of atherosclerosis," said Michael Adams, D.V.M., lead researcher. "This suggests how a diet high in vegetables may help prevent heart attacks and strokes."

The study used specially bred mice that rapidly develop atherosclerosis, the formation on blood vessel walls of fatty plaques that eventually protrude into the vessel's opening and can reduce blood flow. The mice have elevated low-density lipoprotein ( LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, which is also a risk factor for atherosclerosis in humans.

Half of the mice in the study were fed a vegetable-free diet and half got 30 percent of their calories from a mixture of freeze-dried vegetables (this is similar to eating raw or unprocessed vegetables).

After 16 weeks, the researchers measured two forms of cholesterol to estimate the extent of atherosclerosis. In mice that were fed the vegetable diet, researchers found that plaques in the vessel were 38 percent smaller than those in the mice fed vegetable-free diets. There were also modest improvements in body weight and cholesterol levels in the blood.

The estimates of atherosclerosis extent involved measuring free and ester cholesterol, two forms that accumulate in plaques as they develop. The rate of this accumulation has been found to be highly predictive of the actual amount of plaque present in the vessels.

Adams said it is not clear exactly how the high-vegetable diet influenced the development of plaques in the artery walls.

"Although the pathways involved remain uncertain, the results indicate that a diet rich in green and yellow vegetables inhibits the development of hardening of the arteries and may reduce the risk of heart disease," said Adams.

He said that a 37 percent reduction in a certain marker of inflammation in mice suggests that vegetable consumption may inhibit inflammatory activity.

"It is well known that atherosclerosis progression is intimately linked with inflammation in the arteries," Adams said. "Our results, combined with other studies, support the idea that increased vegetable consumption inhibits atherosclerosis progression through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways."

Numerous studies in humans have shown that a high-vegetable diet is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as with reductions in blood pressure and increases in "good" cholesterol. This is believed to be the first study to address the effect of increased vegetable consumption on the development or progression of atherosclerosis.

Despite compelling evidence supporting the health benefits of increased vegetable consumption, intake remains low, Adams said. The mean consumption is 3.2 servings per days, with about 40 percent coming from starchy vegetables such as potatoes.

The research was funded by the General Mills Company, which supplied the freeze-dried vegetables.

Co-researchers were Deborah Golden, B.S., Haiying Chen, Ph.D., Thomas Register, Ph.D., all with Wake Forest, and Eric T. Gugger, Ph.D., with the Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills Company. The cholesterol analysis was performed by the Core Lipoprotein Laboratory of the Department of Pathology/Lipid Sciences at Wake Forest.

New research from Harvard Medical School

Fruits like strawberries are not only delicious and nutrient-rich, new research from Harvard Medical School found that they may offer cardiovascular disease protection as well. The new study found that those who reported eating the most strawberries also experienced lower blood levels of C-reactive protein, a biomarker for inflammation in the blood vessels.

Howard Sesso, ScD and colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health reported their findings in the August issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Using the dietary intake records of approximately 27,000 of the women who participated in the decade-long Women's Health Study, Howard Sesso looked at levels of strawberry consumption along with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. His findings revealed that the women who ate the most strawberries -- two or more servings per week -- compared to those who reported eating none in the past month, were 14 percent less likely to have elevated C-reactive protein levels.

C-reactive protein or CRP is an acidic blood level biomarker that signals the presence of inflammation in the body. Elevated levels of CRP have been shown in multiple studies to be a potentially good predictor of risk for both heart disease and stroke, as it is generally a signal of atherosclerosis. As a result, The Centers for Disease Control and American Heart Association have established guidelines suggesting that blood acidic levels of CRP higher than 3 mg/L may be important in the risk stratification and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Researchers found that those women who had higher strawberry intakes were also more likely to lead a heart-healthy lifestyle. On average, women in the highest strawberry intake group ate about twice as many servings of alkalizing fruits and vegetables every day as did women in the lowest intake group. Not surprisingly, they had much higher average intakes of important heart-healthy nutrients like fiber, potassium and folate. They were also most likely to be non-smokers and get daily physical activity. In addition, the high strawberry consumers had modestly lower levels of both total and LDL cholesterol, indicating a lower level of tissue acidosis.

"Higher intakes of fruits and vegetables have consistently been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Strawberries are a rich source of several key nutrients and phytonutrients that may play a role in protecting heart health. This is the first study to show that strawberries may help reduce the likelihood of having elevated CRP levels in the blood. While more research is needed, this study helps provide more evidence that eating fruits and vegetables will help reduce risk for cardiovascular disease," said Howard Sesso.

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